Page 31 - TalkCare_Issue5_Online.qxp_OACP Talking Care Issue 4 July 2017
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   Many of the people we support in Oxfordshire attended our Summer Fair at
 Originally known as TACT (Thames and Chiltern Trust), Affinity Trust was set up in December 1991 to support people with learning disabilities who were leaving long­stay hospitals across Oxfordshire and Berkshire.
We quickly came to specialise in providing high­quality, tailored support for people with complex and challenging needs.
Since 1991, we have grown steadily and now support over 950 people in 35 local authority areas across England and Scotland.
In 2009, we changed our name to Affinity Trust. By this time, we were supporting people with learning disabilities in many parts of the country, and our old name was no longer relevant or useful.
In 2017, we celebrated our 25th anniversary with parties for staff and people we support across the country.
Many of the people we support in Oxfordshire attended our summer fair at Englefield Garden Centre near Reading in August, enjoying a steelband and a range of games and outdoor activities.
   Our work in Oxfordshire
We’ve been working in Oxfordshire since 2016. We now support 37 people in their own homes in Didcot, Oxford and Wallingford.
We base our support on the needs, choices and ambitions of the individual. We are guided by our values and the principles of person­centred thinking, Active Support and Positive Behaviour Support.
We have a strong track record of supporting those with more complex needs, including people who other organisations have not been able to support appropriately. We enable them to have greater choice and control, and to live an ordinary and meaningful life.
Englefield Garden Centre near Reading, last year, enjoying a steelband and a range of games and outdoor activities.
Supported Living
Around two thirds of the people we support live in their own home. We call this supported living. In this kind of support, the people we support may be tenants or property owners. Some of those living in their own home share support, while others have individual support. With supported living, people have greater choice over many aspects of their lives.
With supported living, the people we support live in their own home. Our staff don’t have an office or other dedicated space in the property, except where overnight sleep­ins are needed. In these and other ways, supported living is different from registered care.
We have helped many people move into their own home from hospitals or care homes. They have flourished with the change, and become more active in their local community.
   Roman’s on the move...
Roman, in his 50s, has a mild learning disability. He has been supported by Affinity Trust since 2016. He lives with three other people, also supported by the charity, in a quiet Oxford suburb.
Roman loves animals, especially cats.
He is keen to show visitors his first­floor room,
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